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NMS Podcast 49

This episode of the Norman Mailer Society podcast, host Justin Bozung features a late-60’s TV appearance of Norman Mailer where the author discusses Miami and the Siege of Chicago, Armies of the Night, as well as his most recent film-making ventures. Also, featured is a 1960 BBC review of Advertisements for Myself featuring a reading of excerpts from “The White Negro.”

St. George Meets The Ramones

NMS Podcast 48

In this episode of the Norman Mailer Society podcast, host Justin Bozung talks with Mailer assistant Martha Thomases about The Executioner’s Song and Mailer’s run-in with the 1970s punk rock band, The Ramones. Also, featured is Mailer’s 1972 lecture to the “Student Apocalypse Society” at the University of Texas at Austin on the Republican and Democratic national conventions of earlier in the year.

Lennon on Mailer & Malaquais

NMS Podcast 47

In this episode of the Norman Mailer Society podcast, host Justin Bozung talks with J. Michael Lennon about Norman Mailer’s friendship with French writer Jean Malaquais, who was one of the writer’s greatest influences.  Often Mailer’s harshest critic, Malaquais served up a partial inspiration for Mailer’s landmark essay, “The White Negro.” The pair had a falling out in 1994 following a joint appearance on a French television series – which is also excerpted in this special episode.

Read “My Friend, Jean Malaquais,” Mailer’s introduction to The Joker by Jean Malaquais.

Throughout the next few months, Lennon and Bozung will be examining Mailer’s introductions, forewords, and prefaces written for such luminaries as Seymour Krim, Michael McClure, Eugene Kennedy, Abbie Hoffman and others.

NMS Podcast 46: Mike Lennon on Dwight Macdonald

In Episode #46 of the Norman Mailer Society podcast, host Justin Bozung and Mailer’s archivist, official biographer, and president of the Norman Mailer Society, J. Michael Lennon, discuss Norman Mailer’s friendship with literary critic and essayist Dwight Macdonald. In 1974, Mailer wrote “Introduction” for Macdonald’s Discriminations: Essays & Afterthoughts. This brief consideration not only reads as an affectionate honorarium to Macdonald, whom Mailer first met in 1949, but also tells of the influence the former editor of Partisan Review had on Mailer himself. Both men share a varied attack on style, but also focus, in the vein of Hemingway, on a means in which one can explore the “feel” of phenomena.

Read Mailer’s Introduction to Discriminations.

Throughout the remainder of 2017, Lennon and Bozung will be examining Mailer’s introductions, forewords, and prefaces written for such luminaries as Seymour Krim, Michael McClure, Eugene Kennedy, Abbie Hoffman and others.